The products of intertextuality: The value of student adaptations in a literature course

  • Misty Krueger University of Maine at Farmington
Keywords: Jane Austen, Digital media, Fandom, Multiderivativeness, Multimodality, Pamela, Parody, Pedagogy, Re-vision, Samuel Richardson, Sense and Sensibility, Sense and Sensibility and Sea Monsters, William Shakespeare, Social media

Abstract

The essay explores a pedagogy of adaptation that focuses on examining intertextuality and engaging students in textual production through the creation of an adaptation. The paper discusses the success of assigning an adaptation project in an upper-level, third-year literature course taught at a small university. It examines student adaptations of writings by William Shakespeare, Jane Austen, Samuel Richardson, Henry Fielding, Mary Shelley, and Ben H. Winters and of existing film adaptations of Sense and Sensibility and Frankenstein. I link student projects to critical concepts such as re-vision and multimodality, and disciplines such as literary studies and the digital humanities. I also analyze how the projects reflect students' interests in popular culture and fandom.

Author Biography

Misty Krueger, University of Maine at Farmington
Visiting Assistant Professor of English
Published
2015-09-15
Section
Praxis